National Public Health Week

During the first full week of April each year, the American Public Health Association brings together communities across the United States to observe National Public Health Week as a time to recognize the contributions of public health and highlight issues that are important to improving our nation's health.

The 2022 National Public Health Week theme is "Public Health is Where You Are."  Each day this week will focus on a different public health topic aimed at making our communities healthier, stronger and safer.  This page contains information about each of these topics.  Consider following our Facebook and Twitter pages for additional information.
 

Daily Themes

Monday:  Racism: A Public Health Crisis

Tuesday:  Public Health Workforce: Essential to our Future

Wednesday:  Community: Collaboration and Resilience

Thursday:  World Health Day: Health is a Human Right

Friday:  Accessibility: Closing the Health Equity Gap

Saturday:  Climate Change: Taking Action for Equity

Sunday: Mental Wellness: Redefining the Meaning of Health
 

RACISM: A PUBLIC HEALTH CRISIS

Long-standing inequities in health care, income, housing, education and many other factors can influence health and well-being. These inequities are largely driven by racism and biases embedded in our systems, institutions, policies and practices. Racism shapes where and how people live and what resources and opportunities they have. While people of color experience more direct negative consequences on their health and wellness due to racism, the inequity driven by racism affects society as a whole. Learn more about how racism affects our nation's health and actions you can take to help make racial equity central to health equity.


PUBLIC HEALTH WORKFORCE: ESSENTIAL TO OUR FUTURE

Research shows that every robust health system must have skilled, motivated and well-supported health workers.  A diverse public health workforce that reflects the diversity of the community they serve is essential to addressing the public health challenges facing our communities today and into the future.  Public health programs and workers need the support and involvement of the communities they serve.  Learn more about how to support the public health workforce in your community.


COMMUNITY: COLLABORATION AND RESILIENCE

Community encompasses every aspect of our lives — it’s where we live, work, learn and play. Conditions in our communities can impact our health and well-being.  These social determinants of health can affect a wide range of health risks and outcomes. To achieve improved health outcomes for people of all identities, we must look to thoughtfully and meaningfully engage members of our communities whose voices are often ignored. Collaborative, community-led, multi-sector approaches to changing policies and systems can address the conditions that hold disparities in place and create more community resilience.  Learn more about how to make an impact on public health in your community.


WORLD HEALTH DAY: HEALTH IS A HUMAN RIGHT

Studies show poverty and poor health outcomes are closely linked. When faced with financial hardship, people must decide between their daily living expenses versus their health needs. As a result, they are more likely to go without necessary care such as consulting with a doctor or getting a prescription. An unequal and fragmented health care system means people receive different care depending on whether they can afford it. To ensure good health is a reality for everyone, we must protect human rights as part of health policies and systems. Learn more about how you can support greater access to health care for all our residents.


ACCESSIBILITY: CLOSING THE HEALTH EQUITY GAP
In the United States, 61.4 million adults (26% of the population) live with a disability. Many of these adults with disabilities are unable to access primary and regular preventive care, which puts them at greater risk to have other health issues. We can work together to improve the health of people living with disabilities and other marginalized groups by reducing health disparities in health insurance, increasing accessibility to health care, increasing availability of appropriate care, building more inclusive public health programs and promoting healthy living. Learn how you can support investments that expand access to affordable health coverage.


CLIMATE CHANGE: TAKING ACTION FOR EQUITY

Certain populations, such as children, older adults, people living with disabilities and chronic illnesses, communities of color, the unsheltered and outdoor workers, are disproportionately affected by climate pollution and climate change.  Increased risk of heat stroke, disease-carrying insects, air pollution, wildfires, flooding-related water contamination and food scarcity are all related to climate change.  To address social inequities and improve our health, we need to strengthen partnerships with communities most impacted by climate change, support community-directed solutions and improve access to health care.  Learn how you can support public health in efforts to advance health equity and climate resilience.


MENTAL WELLNESS: REDEFINING THE MEANING OF HEALTH

Mental health is a critical component of public health and consists of emotional, psychological and social well-being.  But many people live with mental illness, health conditions that change the way we think, feel or behave, which can affect our lives and our work. Strategies like being physically active, getting a full night’s sleep, eating a well-balanced diet, practicing gratitude, participating in activities you enjoy, developing coping skills, meditating and connecting with others can improve mental health.  Learn how you can advocate for mental wellness in your community.

 

 

 

Information on this webpage sourced from www.nphw.org